i just wanna move to the woods and build a farm commune. free education for all. books abound. no interwebz ya’ll

and we’ll grow our own damn food and fuck the rest. 

i can’t handle this. the world is just a mess and i feel helpless. 

@1 year ago with 2 notes
#personal #ramble #run away #farm #books 
@2 years ago
#goats #animals #farm #baby #horns #photography 
intheflowersss:

naturae-interiors:

(via Organic Vegetable Gardens)

yesssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

that’s me in my back yard in ten years <3

intheflowersss:

naturae-interiors:

(via Organic Vegetable Gardens)

yesssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

that’s me in my back yard in ten years <3

@2 years ago with 761 notes
#organic #vegetable #garden #future #farm #beautiful #dream 
jtotheizzoe:

Last week’s reports that organic produce may not be more nutritious than conventional reminds us why oversimplified science may not be healthier for you.
The study (which was really a study of studies), didn’t find strong evidence that organic produce contained more of the good vitamins and stuff when compared to “conventionally grown”. The problem is that many news outlets didn’t look beyond that. Especially you, Gawker … “sham” is a strong word, eh?
The reasons people buy organic produce shouldn’t be limited to just getting an extra 5% of their folate. Unfortunately (as pointed out by thenoobyorker, thanks for the comment), that is precisely why many people buy organic, even though the numbers don’t hold up. It’s about reducing exposure to pesticides and other chemicals (whose long-term effects on our bodies we don’t fully undersand), it’s about supporting farming practices that are less harmful to the land and carry a smaller carbon footprint by not using chemical fertilizers, and it’s about reminding people to buy locally and in season, allowing produce to deliver its maximum goodness as evolution intended (not to mention supporting local farms).
So while you may not get a vitamin boost from the expensive carrots, there’s many other reasons that people may choose to buy them. If we aren’t careful with the science, we could miss them.
More at Boing Boing.

jtotheizzoe:

Last week’s reports that organic produce may not be more nutritious than conventional reminds us why oversimplified science may not be healthier for you.

The study (which was really a study of studies), didn’t find strong evidence that organic produce contained more of the good vitamins and stuff when compared to “conventionally grown”. The problem is that many news outlets didn’t look beyond that. Especially you, Gawker … “sham” is a strong word, eh?

The reasons people buy organic produce shouldn’t be limited to just getting an extra 5% of their folate. Unfortunately (as pointed out by thenoobyorker, thanks for the comment), that is precisely why many people buy organic, even though the numbers don’t hold up. It’s about reducing exposure to pesticides and other chemicals (whose long-term effects on our bodies we don’t fully undersand), it’s about supporting farming practices that are less harmful to the land and carry a smaller carbon footprint by not using chemical fertilizers, and it’s about reminding people to buy locally and in season, allowing produce to deliver its maximum goodness as evolution intended (not to mention supporting local farms).

So while you may not get a vitamin boost from the expensive carrots, there’s many other reasons that people may choose to buy them. If we aren’t careful with the science, we could miss them.

More at Boing Boing.

@1 year ago with 695 notes
#organic #farm #support #local #fresh #nutrients #news 
@2 years ago with 2 notes
#horse #cow #farm #shakers #photography #animals #adorable 

"Occupy the farm is one of a handful of efforts that can reenergize a food movement that has become satisfied with its own success. Supporters of the food movement have become content to “vote with our dollars” in favor of local and organic alternatives, for small farms and farmers markets. But for all the good they do, these vibrant alternatives have not confronted the system head on. No farmers market places limits on the power of corporate agribusiness. No community sponsored agriculture program interferes with industrial farming’s ability to exert its influence on the way that agriculture is governed. Alternatives build power, but they cannot seize power from the systems that currently hold it. Occupy the Farm represents a new way forward for the food movement, one that moves beyond support for alternatives to confront an important player in the industrial food system. It’s a chance to vote, not with our dollars, but with our voices, for the kind of agriculture we want to create and the kind of society we want to be."

@2 years ago with 4 notes
#farmers #food #movement #occupy #occupy the farm #farm #eat 

i just wanna move to the woods and build a farm commune. free education for all. books abound. no interwebz ya’ll

and we’ll grow our own damn food and fuck the rest. 

i can’t handle this. the world is just a mess and i feel helpless. 

1 year ago
#personal #ramble #run away #farm #books 
jtotheizzoe:

Last week’s reports that organic produce may not be more nutritious than conventional reminds us why oversimplified science may not be healthier for you.
The study (which was really a study of studies), didn’t find strong evidence that organic produce contained more of the good vitamins and stuff when compared to “conventionally grown”. The problem is that many news outlets didn’t look beyond that. Especially you, Gawker … “sham” is a strong word, eh?
The reasons people buy organic produce shouldn’t be limited to just getting an extra 5% of their folate. Unfortunately (as pointed out by thenoobyorker, thanks for the comment), that is precisely why many people buy organic, even though the numbers don’t hold up. It’s about reducing exposure to pesticides and other chemicals (whose long-term effects on our bodies we don’t fully undersand), it’s about supporting farming practices that are less harmful to the land and carry a smaller carbon footprint by not using chemical fertilizers, and it’s about reminding people to buy locally and in season, allowing produce to deliver its maximum goodness as evolution intended (not to mention supporting local farms).
So while you may not get a vitamin boost from the expensive carrots, there’s many other reasons that people may choose to buy them. If we aren’t careful with the science, we could miss them.
More at Boing Boing.
1 year ago
#organic #farm #support #local #fresh #nutrients #news 
2 years ago
#goats #animals #farm #baby #horns #photography 
2 years ago
#horse #cow #farm #shakers #photography #animals #adorable 
intheflowersss:

naturae-interiors:

(via Organic Vegetable Gardens)

yesssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

that&#8217;s me in my back yard in ten years &lt;3
2 years ago
#organic #vegetable #garden #future #farm #beautiful #dream 
"Occupy the farm is one of a handful of efforts that can reenergize a food movement that has become satisfied with its own success. Supporters of the food movement have become content to “vote with our dollars” in favor of local and organic alternatives, for small farms and farmers markets. But for all the good they do, these vibrant alternatives have not confronted the system head on. No farmers market places limits on the power of corporate agribusiness. No community sponsored agriculture program interferes with industrial farming’s ability to exert its influence on the way that agriculture is governed. Alternatives build power, but they cannot seize power from the systems that currently hold it. Occupy the Farm represents a new way forward for the food movement, one that moves beyond support for alternatives to confront an important player in the industrial food system. It’s a chance to vote, not with our dollars, but with our voices, for the kind of agriculture we want to create and the kind of society we want to be."
2 years ago
#farmers #food #movement #occupy #occupy the farm #farm #eat